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January 26, 2017 – “Can You Hear Me” Scam

Phone scammers are calling victims and asking “can you hear me?” When you reply “yes” they record your response and use it to make fraudulent purchases on your accounts by saying that you agreed to the charges even though you did not. Read the full article from CBS Money Watch here.

The best advice is to not answer calls from numbers you do not know or hang up if you receive a call similar to this.

You can submit a consumer complaint to the FTC online at: ftc.gov/complaint or call: (1-877-FTC-HELP/1-877-382-4357).

September 9, 2016 – NCUA Fraudulent Text Messages

The National Credit Union Administration has received numerous consumer calls about suspicious text messages claiming to be from the agency. These messages are not being sent from NCUA. The agency does not seek personal information through the internet or on the telephone. If you receive a text message claiming to be from the NCUA contact their Consumer Assistance Center at 1-800-755-1030 between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. You should also contact your credit union and local law enforcement to inform them of the fraudulent message.

The messages read: ““National Credit Union Administration Alert for (recipient’s phone number). Contact 844-234-5445.” Other fraudulent phone numbers to be alert for are 855-340-1398 and 844-906-0773.”

You may also contact the Internet Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National White Collar Crime Center. NCUA operates an online Fraud Prevention Center that offers information about avoiding frauds and scams on its MyCreditUnion.gov website.

If you suspect you may have become a victim of identity theft because of this scam, you should immediately contact the three major credit bureaus and request a fraud alert be placed on your credit report: Equifax (888-766-0008), Experian (888-397-3742), and TransUnion (800-680-7289).

July 5, 2016 – Noodles & Company Data Breach

Noodles & Co. announced this week that there was a “data security incident” that may have compromised customer’s payment information from their debit and credit cards between January 31 – June 2. They found that the compromise only affected credit and debit card data that was used at certain locations in as many as 28 states. A list of locations can be found on their website.

May 31, 2016 – Passwords Being Sold From Data Breaches

65 million passwords are being sold on the Dark Web from the Tumblr Data Breach in 2013. The same fraudster  is also selling information from LinkedIn, Fling and MySpace. If you have accounts with any of these social media websites, please log in and change your password to reduce the chance of fraudulent activity on your account. For more information on this data breach and Dark Web password sale click here.

June 30, 2015 – Central PA IRS Phone Scam

Central PA residents are receiving threatening calls that claim to be coming from an IRS agent. The call or message states that the IRS is filing a lawsuit against you for back taxes. Some callers are even threatening jail time if payment is not received. The calls may show that they are from a DC number (202 area code), but are from spoof phones that are likely outside of the US.

IRS agents will not call consumers, unless they first mailed a bill, or demand money without giving the option to appeal the amount. Officials also say they will not threaten arrest or police involvement.

As a reference the IRS will NEVER:

  • Ask for credit, debit, or prepaid card information over the phone
  • Insist that taxpayer use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations
  • Request immediate payment over by phone
  • Take forceful action immediately following a phone conversation

Taxpayers usually receive prior notification of IRS enforcement action involving IRS tax liens or levies.

If you have been contacted by one of these scammers do not be afraid to contact the police, the IRS, or submit your claim online.

April 13, 2015 – Phone Scammers

Members have contacted 1st Ed Credit Union to let us know that are receiving calls from a credit card company, credit union, or bank saying that there was fraudulent activity on their account and it may be blocked. This call may be automated or from a person. Then they request your card number or 3-digit security code. Do not give them any information about your debit or credit card. Please follow the steps below:

  • Document the call:
    • Write down:
      • The phone number that called you,
      • The representative’s name & title, and
      • The name of the company.
    • Date and time of the call.
    • Did they ask you to send money? If so, how much?
  • Contact your credit card company, credit union, or bank using the customer service number on the back of the card.
  • Ask them if there was fraudulent activity on your account.
    • If there is fraud on your account; know that you are directly speaking to a representative that will help you through the process of removing the charges.
    • If there isn’t fraud, let them know that you were contacted by a phone scammer asking for your debit or credit card information.
    • Submit a consumer complaint to the FTC online at: ftc.gov/complaint or call: (1-877-FTC-HELP/1-877-382-4357).

Please remember that 1st Ed Credit Union will never contact you to ask for your debit or credit card numbers.

In the event that we notice fraudulent activity on your account, we will contact you to verify the transaction. Be sure that we have your current phone number, e-mail address, and street address so that we can contact you in a timely manner about your account.

If you have received one of these calls or fallen victim to the phone scam please submit your complaint to the FTC online or by phone (1-877-FTC-HELP – 1-877-382-4357). To view more information on Phone Scams from the FTC, click here.

March 26, 2015 – Text Scam to Consumers From NCUA Phone Number

More than 40 consumers around the country have received a scam phone text message purporting to use a National Credit Union Administration phone number, the agency announced Wednesday.

Consumers who receive a text from 703-518-6301 asking for personal information should contact the agency’s Consumer Assistance Center hotline at 800-755-1030.

The NCUA’s privacy policy states that it will never request personal or financial information from consumers.

According to the NCUA, the perpetrators are able to mimic a telephone number to generate text messages. The messages may warn of a debit card reaching its limit or use some other trick to persuade individuals to provide personal information or go to a malicious website.

Consumers should not click on links in the message, provide information to any websites referenced in the message nor attempt to conduct any financial transactions through those websites.

This attempted fraud scam is classified as “spoofing” by the Federal Communications Commission.

March 18, 2015 – NCUA Warning: Website Uses Similar Logo and Mimics Website Design and Language

The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) has received reports of an online phishing scam that use a website with a logo and a design similar to the agency’s own site in an attempt to convince unwary customers to provide information or send money.

Consumers have received emails from the National Credit Union website, which apparently originates in Australia and claims to offer services in the United States, Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. This website is not affiliated in any way with the National Credit Union Administration, a federal agency, and the emails are not from NCUA.

The emails attempt to persuade individuals to provide personal information, such as Social Security numbers, account numbers and login information, or transfer large amounts of money. Consumers should neither provide information to this website nor attempt to conduct any financial transactions through it. NCUA would not request personal or financial information in this manner. See NCUA’s Privacy Policy for more information.

Consumers receiving such emails should call NCUA’s Fraud Hotline toll-free at 800-827-9650 or 703-518-6550 in the Washington, D.C., area. Consumers should also contact the Internet Crime Complaint Center, a partnership between the FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center. NCUA also offers information about avoiding frauds and scams on its MyCreditUnion.gov website.

Consumers who suspect they may have become victims of identity theft should immediately contact their financial institutions and, if necessary, close existing accounts and open new ones. NCUA urges consumers also contact the three major credit bureaus—Equifax (800-525-6285), Experian (888-397-3742) and TransUnion (800-680-7289)—to request a fraud alert be placed on their credit reports.

NCUA is the independent federal agency created by the U.S. Congress to regulate, charter and supervise federal credit unions. With the backing of the full faith and credit of the United States, NCUA operates and manages the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund, insuring the deposits of more than 99 million account holders in all federal credit unions and the overwhelming majority of state-chartered credit unions. At MyCreditUnion.gov and Pocket Cents, NCUA also educates the public on consumer protection and financial literacy issues.

August 14, 2014 – IRS Warning about Phone Scams

The International Revenue Service and Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration continue to hear from taxpayers who have received unsolicited calls from individuals demanding payment while fraudulently claiming to be from the IRS. Potential phone scam victims are receiving angry, threatening calls from people who say they are from the IRS and demanding immediate payments from the victims. There have also been victims that received calls stating they were entitled to big refunds. If you receive a call and ignore it they have been trying to call back. If you have been targeted by this scam, contact TIGTA at 800-366-4484 and the Federal Trade Commission on their “FTC Complaint Assistant” at FTC.gov.

IRS Commissioner advises taxpayers that the IRS will send official correspondence through the mail for the first contact.

As a reference the IRS will NEVER:

  • Ask for credit, debit, or prepaid card information over the phone
  • Insist that taxpayer use a specific payment method to pay tax obligations
  • Request immediate payment over by phone
  • Take forceful action immediately following a phone conversation

Taxpayers usually receive prior notification of IRS enforcement action involving IRS tax liens or levies.

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